Can You Name This Victorian Item?

Let’s have some fun and learn a little about the Victorian era at the same time.

The two items below both serve the same function.

Can you say what they are and how they’re used?

Leave your guess in a comment.

On Monday, I’ll update the post, provide the name of the item, and say how it was used.

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Many guessed correctly, saying the items pictured are jabots, an accessory worn at the throat. In the 1600s and 1700s they were worn by men. In the latter half of the 1800s, the period when my stories take place, they were worn primarily by women. Learn more here.

• • •

The images are permission-free designs from Victorian Fashion Accessories, a Dover Publications book and CD-ROM my family gave me for Christmas. They know what I like!

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About Keli Gwyn

I'm an award-winning author of inspirational historical romance smitten with the Victorian Era. I'm currently writing for Harlequin's Love Inspired Historical line of wholesome, faith-filled romances. My debut novel, A Bride Opens Shop in El Dorado, California, was released July 1, 2012. I'm represented by Rachelle Gardner of Book & Such Literary. I live in a Gold Rush-era town at the foot of the majestic Sierras. My favorite places to visit are my fictional worlds, other Gold Country towns and historical museums. When I'm not writing I enjoy taking walks, working out at Curves™ and reading.
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34 Responses to Can You Name This Victorian Item?

  1. careann says:

    I’d say a lady’s lace jabot … sort of the equivalent to a man’s cravat, worn at the neck.

  2. my first thought was that it is something that goes in a woman’s hair, hanging from the bun or from underneath. but i read the comments….and then looked up images for a jabot….and i don’t think that’s right! but what do i know. eager to see what it is!

  3. Keli Gwyn says:

    Thanks to everyone who left a guess. Many guessed correctly, saying the items pictured are jabots, an accessory worn at the throat. In the 1600s and 1700s they were worn by men. In the latter half of the 1800s, the period when my stories take place, they were worn primarily by women.

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